What Should Be the URL of My Blog?

 Computer screen open, ready to set up your blog

One of you, my dear readers, just emailed me asking if the initial setup of your blog was looking good. I sent you a reply via email, and I thought that reply could be useful to others, so I've included the information here in a post as well. 

Choosing a blog URL: Subdomain vs. subfolder

When setting up a blog, some businesses find it easier to set up a subdomain, meaning their blog will live at a location that looks like this: blog.example.com. There are some benefits to doing this, but it is more beneficial to set up a subfolder (or subdirectory), which looks something like this: example.com/blog. The benefits of using a subfolder are usually an advantage for your SEO.  

Subfolders have more SEO value

Although there is some debate on this issue, many experts have built consensus around the idea that subfolders are more beneficial. This means that your blog URL should live in a folder on your site, e.g., example.com/blog. 

According to Dave Chaffey, "Google will crawl new blog posts typically within days of launch" and "Backlinks and social mentions generated by the content on the blog can help other [content] on the domain i.e. product pages rank more highly." 

Moz is one of the best sources for learning about SEO. Its SEO Learning Center states, "Search engines keep different metrics for domains than they do for subdomains, so even though Google itself has stated that — from a ranking perspective — content in subdomains and subdirectories is treated roughly equally, it's still recommended that webmasters place link-worthy content like blogs in subfolders rather than subdomains (i.e. www.example.com/blog/ rather than blog.example.com)."

Another great source for information related to SEO is SEO.com, where Andy Eliason writes, "While blogs on subdomains provide very little SEO value, some companies still choose to divide up their website this way." He says, "Blog integration is an important part of content marketing, and more and more of your SEO is going to rely on that high-quality, regularly produced content. You don’t want to separate all that good stuff from your main domain." 

Dharmesh Shah, the founder of Hubspot, shared the advice he got from his friend Rand Fishkin: "More recently, my friend (and co-creator of inbound.org) Rand Fishkin dug back into this topic ... I'll summarize his position: Use sub-directories if you can. They're better for SEO. Even though Google has stated it doesn't matter -- for now, it does seem to."